Awkward. Natalia Brasova with her second husband, Vladimir Wulfert (left) and her future lover and husband, Grand Duke Michael Alexandrovich, brother of Nicholas II and, briefly, the last Tsar. Natalia and Michael met when her husband was serving in The Dowager Empress's Life Guard Cuirassier Regiment, known as the Blue Cuirassiers from the colour of their uniforms, stationed at Gatchina near St Petersburg. Natalia was Russia's version of "Mrs Simpson" with two divorces before she married Michael (without the Tsar's permission) and the birth of Michael's son George before her second divorce was concluded .... Their marriage created a terrific scandal and Nicholas exiled them from Russia until World War I when they were allowed to return and Michael was permitted to serve in the armed forces. Shunned by the Imperial Family she took the title Countess Brasova after Michael's country estate of Brasovo. Following the abdication of Nicholas II, Michael was technically Tsar for less than a day until he too renounced the throne. Natalia escaped from Russia by the skin of her teeth following Michael's murder by the Bolsheviks in 1918 (she had earlier managed to get little George out of Russia accompanied by his nanny). Sadly, George was killed in a car crash in 1931 and Natalia died alone and in poverty in Paris in 1952 aged 71. Incidentally, in 1920 she and her young son met Michael's mother, the formidable Dowager Empress Marie, when they were all exiles in London - a slightly less difficult reunion than Natalia's only other encounter with her mother-in-law back in 1913. #russia#russianhistory #russianroyalty #saintpetersburg #russianrevolution #granddukemichael#nataliabrasova #royalty#europeanroyalty#alexandrafeodorovna#edwardianwomen#russianimperialfamily#gatchina #romanov #russia#architecture #russianarchitecture #landscapephotography

This entry was posted on 19/11/2016 at 08:18 by @paulbr12 . 18 tags, such as #russia, #russianhistory, #russianroyalty, #saintpetersburg and #russianrevolution where used on post, 269 people liked and 18 people left a comment up to now.

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Awkward. Natalia Brasova with her second husband, Vladimir Wulfert (left) and her future lover and  husband, Grand Duke Michael Alexandrovich, brother of Nicholas II and, briefly, the last Tsar. Natalia and Michael met when her husband  was serving in The Dowager Empress's Life Guard Cuirassier Regiment, known as the Blue Cuirassiers from the colour of their uniforms, stationed at Gatchina near St Petersburg. Natalia was Russia's version of "Mrs Simpson" with two divorces before she married Michael (without the Tsar's permission) and the birth of Michael's son George before her second divorce was concluded .... Their marriage created a terrific scandal and Nicholas exiled them from Russia until World War I when they were allowed to return and Michael was permitted to serve in the armed forces. Shunned by the Imperial Family she took the title Countess Brasova after Michael's country estate of Brasovo. Following the abdication of Nicholas II, Michael was technically Tsar for less than a day until he too renounced the throne. Natalia escaped from Russia by the skin of her teeth following Michael's murder by the Bolsheviks in 1918 (she had earlier managed to get little George out of Russia accompanied by his nanny). Sadly, George was  killed in a car crash in 1931 and Natalia died alone and in poverty in Paris in 1952 aged 71.  Incidentally, in 1920 she and her young son met Michael's mother, the formidable Dowager Empress Marie, when they were all exiles in London - a slightly less difficult  reunion than Natalia's only other encounter with her mother-in-law back in 1913. #russia#russianhistory #russianroyalty #saintpetersburg #russianrevolution #granddukemichael#nataliabrasova  #royalty#europeanroyalty#alexandrafeodorovna#edwardianwomen#russianimperialfamily#gatchina #romanov #russia#architecture #russianarchitecture #landscapephotography

Comments 18

dburstyn

Deborah Burstyn (@dburstyn)

So sad. 💔 I am reading Nabakov's "Speak, Memory" and agree with @audreysucarroll about the tragedy of this era. Thank you for bringing this to my attention @samjr1919

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